YOUR NUMBER 1 FRENCHIE BREEDER

A ‘hero’ family dog chased off a group of four machete-wielding home invaders who broke down the door to her family’s home.

When father-of-four Paul Davis’s house in Birmingham was attacked by the hooded thugs, his devoted Staffordshire bull terrier Macey didn’t think twice about ‘laying her life on the line’ for her family.

CCTV footage captures a group of men surveying the house and looking in windows before one charges forward to break down the door.

With two swift kicks, the door is brought down and a second man rushes in, pulling out a machete.

But seven-year-old Macey and French bulldog Bruce, three, are not about to let them enter freely.

A 'hero' family dog chased off a group of four machete-wielding home invaders after the gang broke into a home in Birmingham

A ‘hero’ family dog chased off a group of four machete-wielding home invaders after the gang broke into a home in Birmingham

When father-of-four Paul Davis's house was attacked by the hooded thugs, his devoted Staffordshire bull terrier Macey (pictured) didn't think twice about 'laying her life on the line' for her family

When father-of-four Paul Davis’s house was attacked by the hooded thugs, his devoted Staffordshire bull terrier Macey (pictured) didn’t think twice about ‘laying her life on the line’ for her family

Mr Davis lives with his fiancée Jenna Byrne (pictured together), also 36, and his three daughters

Mr Davis lives with his fiancée Jenna Byrne (pictured together), also 36, and his three daughters

With two swift kicks, the door is brought down and a second man rushes in, pulling out a machete (pictured)

With two swift kicks, the door is brought down and a second man rushes in, pulling out a machete (pictured)

The man backs up out of the house when he realises the dogs are there before sending his horrifying weapon crashing down on Bruce.

Macey fights back and chases him outside before sprinting down the street after the men who flee in fear.

Poor Bruce was left with a gash on his back in the attack and Macey was kicked as she pursued the men along the road.

Mechanic Mr Davis, 36, had no idea what was going on when the noise of the attack awoke him in the middle of the night on July 30.

CCTV footage captures a group of men surveying the house and looking in windows (pictured) before one charges forward to break down the door

CCTV footage captures a group of men surveying the house and looking in windows (pictured) before one charges forward to break down the door

Seven-year-old Macey (right) and French bulldog Bruce, three, (left) were not about to let them enter freely

Seven-year-old Macey (right) and French bulldog Bruce, three, (left) were not about to let them enter freely

Macey fights back and chases him outside before sprinting down the street after the men who flee in fear

Macey fights back and chases him outside before sprinting down the street after the men who flee in fear

But as he jumped out of bed to check, the banging finished and Paul discovered his faithful pooch staring up at his window from the driveway below.

Mr Davis, who lives with his fiancée Jenna Byrne, also 36, and his three daughters, said: ‘Macey is our absolute hero.

‘I’d always questioned what she would do if we were attacked but she darted past me.

‘It was like she looked at me and decided “dad isn’t going, I am”. She laid her life on the line for us.

‘I think she saved my life that night and probably that of Jenna and the girls too. When I saw her sat there looking up at the bedroom like “I got them dad”, I was gobsmacked.

‘She’s had lots of treats. She slept in the bed with me last night, we bought her a dog cake and a bottle of dog beer.

‘She’ll keep getting them for the rest of her life. We can never repay her for what she did.’

Mr Davis believes the house was targeted due to the Land Rover on their driveway, but because of Macey’s fearless intervention, the only damage caused to the family home was a smashed front door and some broken brickwork around it.

Mr Davis believes the house was targeted due to the Land Rover on their driveway, but because of Macey's fearless intervention, the only damage caused to the family home was a smashed front door and some broken brickwork around it. Pictured: Mr Davis's daughter Kayli with their dogs

Mr Davis believes the house was targeted due to the Land Rover on their driveway, but because of Macey’s fearless intervention, the only damage caused to the family home was a smashed front door and some broken brickwork around it. Pictured: Mr Davis’s daughter Kayli with their dogs

Poor Bruce was left with a gash on his back (pictured) in the attack and Macey was kicked as she pursued the men along the road

Poor Bruce was left with a gash on his back (pictured) in the attack and Macey was kicked as she pursued the men along the road

In their escape, the culprits dented the wing mirror of a mobility car used to transport youngest daughter Klara, seven.

There may not be much physical damage done to the house, but Mr Davis and his girls Kayli, 15, Kortney, 12, and Klara are all emotionally scarred by the attack.

Son Jay, 17, was out of the house when the incident happened.

Mr Davis said: ‘We’re all still really shaken up. The girls don’t want to stay in the house and that’s the hardest part.

‘The thing that really affects me is how this has and will continue to affect my kids. Kortney has gone to stay at my mum’s for now. Kayli hasn’t been able to sleep.

‘I haven’t eaten since. My belly is rumbling but I’m not hungry.

‘I just don’t want this happening to any other families. A couple more houses were tried by them on our street, one on our side of the road and another on the opposite side.

Mr Davis spoiled his brave pooches with a dog cake which read 'heros' along with ice cream and doggy beer

Mr Davis spoiled his brave pooches with a dog cake which read ‘heros’ along with ice cream and doggy beer

‘We were all fast asleep and I must have woken up on the first kick. I heard the end of it but just thought it was a big bang.

‘So I looked out of the window as a first reaction and all I saw was that shiny machete in the air. All I could think was I need to look after Jenna and the girls.

‘I felt slightly better knowing the girls were locked in their rooms but then I realised I had no idea what the scumbags were going to do.

‘I knew I’d seen a few of them so I just stood three steps down from the top of the stairs and stayed there for a minute but it felt so much louder.

‘When I hadn’t heard any banging downstairs, I peeked out of the window to see if they were still outside. I couldn’t see anything even when I looked up and down the road.

‘Jenna had a panic attack and Kayli was on the phone for an ambulance.

‘Bruce must have run downstairs first. He got hit with the knife properly and has a gash on his back.

‘Macey moves so fast I don’t think they hit her with the machete, but they did kick her across the road.’

Despite the emotional effects, Mr Davis and his family know that Macey will always be prepared to protect them.

Ms Byrne said: ‘I just love the fact you can see Macey looking up at the window all proud like “I did it dad, I got rid of them”.

‘The other angle is great because you can see her chasing them off. Even from something so horrible, it was quite funny to see her go for their ankles.

‘Staffies do get a lot of stick these days and it can be hard because people try to make them a bully breed.

‘It was just so amazing to see what she did for us. For her to sit outside and wait to come back in like that, it just shows how good a dog she is.

‘She’s such a big part of our family and just a really lovely dog with the kids. She wouldn’t bite anyone even if we told her to.

‘There’s no training for her to have done what she did, it was just her natural instinct to protect us.’

UPDATE: OWNER REPORTED DOG WAS HOME

Date Found August 07, 2020

Area Found (Please include city/town) Southern pines nc: W broad street

Street or Road W broad at in front of hatchet brewing

Closest Major Intersection W broad and Illinois

Primary Phone (719) 330-6350

Additional Comments Just saw a chihuahua french bulldog mix (black and white) running down W Broad St in front of the Ship Onsite. No collar and I didn’t have my phone to take a pic. Seemed very timid and ran around the back of the building when we tried to grab him😞

Breed chihuahua french bulldog mix (black and white)

Is Pet Spayed or Neutered? Unsure

Size/Weight of Pet Tiny (1-10 lb)

Has Pet Been Scanned for Microchip? Unsure

Atlanta police are looking for a pair of dognappers who took a man’s puppy at gunpoint from a park on Saturday.

“The puppy was off its leash and two male suspects took the animal and threatened the victim with a firearm when the victim protested,” Officer Steve Avery told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The robbery took place at around 8:30 a.m. at Washington Park on the city’s west side.

Doomsday death & deception: Nancy Grace investigates “Cult Mom” Lori Vallow. Inside sources reveal brand new bombshell information. Click here to watch.

The missing puppy is a French bulldog.

No one was injured, police said.

For the latest true crime and justice news, subscribe to the ‘Crime Stories with Nancy Grace’ podcast. Here is a related episode.

Join Nancy Grace for her new online video series designed to help you protect what you love most – your children.

[Featured image: A French bulldog puppy (not the stolen one)/Pixabay]

Liam Hemsworth and Gabriella Brooks seem to have adopted a new puppy (Picture: Splashnews.com)

Liam Hemsworth and Gabriella Brooks appear to have taken the next step in their relationship and found themselves a four-legged friend to call their own.

The couple seem to have adopted an adorable French bulldog puppy, with Liam and Gabriella stepping out with their new addition in Byron Bay, Australia.

As well as stopping at the shops for a spot of retail therapy in the quirky coastal town, Liam was seen fussing over his new pup.

The Hunger Games actor, 30, sat in the car with his pooch sitting pretty on his lap, cutely sticking its head and legs out the window.

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Liam was dressed down for his day out in Bryon in a grey t-shirt and navy shorts, while a fresh faced Gabriella rocked a black playsuit and trainers.

She and Liam have been dating since December last year, following his move back to Australia after splitting from ex-wife Miley Cyrus.

Liam was seen holding their new pup in his lap (Picture: Splashnews.com) The pair were spotted shopping together in Byron Bay (Picture: Splashnews.com)

Liam had married long-term girlfriend Miley in December 2018, after 10 years of dating, at her family home in Nashville, Tennessee.

Eight months later, however, the on/off couple announced their decision to split, with Liam later moving on with Gabriella and returning to his native down under.

Sources had told People at the time that things were getting ‘serious’ for the pair, with Liam’s older brother Chris later celebrating his brother’s move back home.

Liam has been dating Gabriella since December last year (Picture: Splashnews.com)

While joking he had managed to get Liam ‘out of Malibu’, Chris said that he thinks little brother Liam is the best looking Hemsworth, after seeing his Men’s Health Australia cover released in May.

‘Did you see the Men’s Health cover? I thought, “Not bad kid. Not bad.” He’s out there training and staying fit, and back in Australia doing his thing,’ Chris told News.com.au.

‘It’s Australian living, I guess. We got him out of Malibu!’

In his cover shoot, Liam credited exercise for helping him to ‘rebuild’ following the breakdown of his marriage.

Addressing his amped up exercise regime, Liam said: ‘I was doing like 10km a day or something at one point, which I’ve never done in my life.’

More: Entertainment

Asked what his focus had been, the Isn’t It Romantic star replied: ‘Rebuilding? Yeah, that’s a good way to put it.’

He added: ‘This last six months, honestly, for keeping my head level and just staying balanced, I’d say exercise has been big for me.’

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Prices for the UK’s most desirable dog breeds have reached record levels as some sellers exploit the demand for puppies during lockdown, a study has found.

Dachshunds led the way with an 89% price hike as the average price rose to £1,838 in June compared to £973 in March, the Dogs Trust study found.

By reviewing advertisements from the last three years on some of the UK’s largest classified advertising websites, they found prices for Pugs, Dachshunds and Chow Chows have never been higher.

English and French bulldogs have also seen significant price increases as demand for puppies soared when millions of people started working from home after lockdown was announced on 23 March.

Google searches for “buy a puppy” increased by 166% after that date.

Chow Chows had the next highest increase after Dachshunds, with the fluffy pooches going for 67% more – from £1,119 in March to £1,872 in June.

Pug prices went up by 56%, from £684 in March to £1,064 in June.

French bulldogs increased by 52% from £1,251 in March to £1,905 in June, while English Bulldogs had a 31% price hike, from £1,637 in March to £2,140 in June.

The Dogs Trust said its Puppy Pilot scheme, which rescues smuggled puppies at the UK border, has remained busy during lockdown, despite restrictions on movement around the world.

Image: Chow Chow Puppies were going for an average of £1,872 in June

A total of 43 puppies illegally imported into the country from central and eastern Europe were rescued by the charity between the beginning of lockdown and the end of June.

If sold, they could have fetched an estimated £80,000.

Twelve heavily pregnant dogs were also saved during lockdown and have now given birth to 56 puppies – worth around £100,000 to smugglers.

The charity is concerned there will be up to 40,000 dogs abandoned in the coming months as a result of people buying puppies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dogs Trust’s veterinary director and chair of the Pet Advertising Advisory Group, Paula Boyden said: “It’s shocking to see how much dogs are being advertised for sale online and in particular how prices for some of the most popular smuggled breeds have increased during the coronavirus lockdown.

Image: Pug puppies soared by 56% Image: French Bulldog pups went up by 52%

“While there are many responsible sellers out there, sadly there are plenty who are just looking to tug on the heartstrings and exploit the situation for their own profit.

“With puppies in such high demand, and selling for such high prices, it’s creating a lucrative market for cruel puppy smugglers and, sadly, we have rescued many dogs illegally imported into the country, destined to be sold during lockdown.

“It’s also creating a perfect storm for people to be “dogfished” and scammed out of their hard-earned money.

Image: English Bulldog puppies were going for £2,140 on average

“That is why it is so important to always see a pup with and interacting with their mum and to go and see them more than once.

“Never pay a deposit without seeing the puppy in person first and check all paperwork carefully. If something doesn’t seem right, as hard as it may be, walk away and report the seller.”

  • When I moved to New York earlier this year, I signed up for a part-time dog walking gig to help me earn extra income.
  • During the first two weeks I had a hard time bonding with Watson, a French Bulldog, so when the coronavirus pandemic hit the city, I stopped walking him.
  • Feeling isolated and disconnected, I quickly found I longed for Watson’s companionship, so resumed our daily walks.
  • My time with Watson ended up teaching me to let go, be more mindful, and appreciate the little things.

Earlier this year, my husband and I moved from Hong Kong — where I had lived for a decade — to New York City.

As a newcomer navigating the city during the coronavirus pandemic, I was longing for a dog. Since my landlord wouldn’t allow it, I thought dog walking could be a fun side gig — not only allowing me to earn extra income, but also to explore the city by foot.

Dog walking wasn’t new to me. Before moving from Manila to Shanghai in 2004, I used to walk my two Shih Tzus Cookie and Chubby, but when they died I decided not to get another dog, as my job involved a lot of travel.Advertisement When I arrived in New York, I signed up for dog walking apps like Swifto and Rover. After going through interviews, tests, and background checks, I was contacted by a neighboring family who wanted me to walk their French Bulldog Watson 30 minutes each day, five times a week, for $20 per walk. I hoped walking Watson would ease my loneliness 30 minutes is short, I initially thought, but I thought the dog’s presence could ease my loneliness and be a source of comfort, companionship, and motivation.

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Since I only know a handful of people in the city, the feelings of isolation would sometimes creep in, and I found I wasn’t having much social interaction.

Luckily, studies show the companionship that pets offer can be a great way to reduce anxiety and stress. Science also suggests the bond we create and the eye contact we make with dogs can release the feel-good hormone oxytocin. Advertisement

“The bond you create with a dog feels liberating,” Corina K. Skentzou, a licensed mental health counselor and psychotherapist in New York City, told Insider. “Neurophysiologically speaking, it helps your brain produce oxytocin or love hormone, a buffer of cortisol and adrenaline which are elevated due to our competitive societies and stressful lifestyles.”

Watson was stubborn at first, and the first 2 weeks were frustrating

I first met Watson three weeks before the pandemic hit New York City. Like other small dog breeds, he is cute and lovable — he has large bat ears, a white marking on his face, and a muscular build.

He’s also an emotional support animal (ESA), a type of dog that provides emotional support to an individual with a mental health condition or emotional disorder.Advertisement

Watson wasn’t an easy dog to deal with at first, though; whenever I showed up at the owner’s doorstep, he would run away from me. I had to carry him or lure him with treats so I could put a leash on him.

Watson loved making pit stops in between our walks. He would sniff for leftover food or lick an empty ketchup packet on the ground that I had to wrestle from him. I found myself getting impatient, and instead pulling out my phone and listening to a podcast or browsing Twitter.

The idea of exploring other neighborhoods didn’t seem appealing to Watson at first, either — he continually walked a specific route to Madison Square Park, and sometimes would make a loop until we reached the park.Advertisement

When I tried to coax him to walk somewhere different, he would look up at me and refuse to walk. Sometimes I could lightly tug him a little until he went the way I wanted, but more often than not I had to literally pick him up and turn him the way I wanted to go.

When I was forced to stop walking him, isolation took a toll on my mental health When New York became the epicenter of the pandemic, I didn’t want to venture out any more, as I was afraid of contracting or spreading the virus, so I decided to stop walking Watson until the situation got better. Advertisement

Thankfully, the owners reassured me the gig would still be available when I decided to come back.

As I kept myself in isolation over the following weeks, I got anxious and stressed about the threat of the illness, my finances, and balancing work and home demands. The stress of the situation took a toll on my wellbeing, both mental and physical. Despite my initial frustrations, I found I longed for Watson’s companionship and that human-animal interaction more than I expected, so I ultimately decided to start walking him again, giving myself an excuse to go outside and get some exercise (and snuggles, of course).Advertisement Walking Watson reduced my anxiety and motivated me to start my day

Walking Watson ended up feeling therapeutic, and gave me the motivation to start my day early. Spending time with him lifted my spirits, reduced my anxiety, and made me feel more socially connected. Walking him to the park led me to interesting conversations with other dog owners or walkers.

“As humans, we’re hardwired for connection,” Skentzou told Insider. “We live in a very competitive society and we don’t allow ourselves to be vulnerable. The lack of connection is correlated to one of the saddest, most anxious, most panicky and loneliest societies ever.”

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When we reached the park, he would roll in the grass and make me scratch his belly. Rolling back again, he would show his flappy tongue and crooked teeth as if sending me a message that he was feeling happy to be spending time with me.

It’s hard to stay worried or upset with a dog like Watson, who reminded me not to forget the good in life, even in stressful times.

The walks taught me to appreciate the little things Picking up Watson became a breeze. By 9 a.m., he would already be sitting by the door waiting for me to put a leash on him. I no longer needed to lure him with out treats as he would run straight to the elevator. Advertisement Walking Watson taught me to be flexible in situations where I would normally have been uptight. It helped me let go of control by letting him take me the way he wanted — when I did, our walks turned out to be more enjoyable and freeing.

Every day was different, and our walks would typically last for about an hour in the end. He started to stride right past Madison Square Park, and has shown me pockets of Broadway and Little Italy, places I’d never been before.

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It’s been two weeks now since Watson and his owners permanently left New York for Los Angeles. Though I won’t be able to see him again, I’ll remember the experience forever.

My walks with Watson forced me to be more mindful. I’m someone who’s always on the go, and I get restless when I’m still, but the experience reminded me to pause for a moment and appreciate the little things in life: be it the flowers blooming, the squirrels hopping, or the sun shining. It may seem like I moved to New York at the wrong time, but spending time with Watson ultimately helped me make a small shift in my lifestyle to slow down, take a breath, and pause every now and then.Advertisement

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With just a week to go to enter the Tele’s Paw Prints pet photo competition, more than 350 pet-loving readers have sent in cute pictures of the dogs, cats and others to the competition.

One particular “superstar” which grabbed our eye was ‘Rodman’ the French bulldog.

Although he goes by Rodney during the day, by nightfall he becomes Rodman, complete with a superhero mask and cape, and during the coronavirus lockdown he has been using his superpowers to spread love, happiness and slobbers across Tayside.

His owner Chloe said he had risen to the challenge and become the local area’s very own caped crusader.

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Chloe said: “He really is a superstar, the superhero costume is his first outfit and he loves wearing it.

“We actually struggle to get it off him.

“He wears it when we go out for walks and the kids love it, it makes everyone smile especially when it’s windy and his cape blows, it is dead cute.

“I have always wanted a wee lap dog like him and he has his own Instagram and TikTok pages and he is really good at sitting for his picture.

“My grandad also has dementia so we have been taking him to the care home in his outfit to cheer up the residents during the Covid-19 outbreak, they all thought he looked dead funny, everyone was laughing.”

Rodman the dog has been delighting everyone during the coronavirus lockdown.

Chloe works as the dog warden for Angus Council and says Rodman is her shadow, sometimes even coming into work with her.

But right now Chloe is focusing on Rodman’s third birthday, which they will be celebrating in just a fortnight’s time.

She continued: “It is his birthday in two weeks so we have lots of balloons for him and we are having a party in the park with him.

“We will take him out for lunch at an outdoor café as well – his absolute favourite thing is a puppiccino from Starbucks.

“We are also getting him a puffer jacket so he can match with my fiancé Brad which will be dead cute.

“He is his own little person.”

She added: “I go all over the place with him but he has a tumour on his neck just now so we are taking it easy until that disappears and then he can get back to his adventures.

“I’ve been going through a really tough time recently but having a dog makes everything 10 times easier because they know how to comfort you. He is a very special dog.”

Paw Prints is the Tele’s first ever pet competition and there are three categories – dogs, cats and then a best of the rest.

Each category will have one overall winner voted for by the public via coupons printed in the paper, and each purrfect pet will win a £100 pet shop voucher, a trophy, a canvas print of their image and a pet hamper.

Voting will open on Friday, August 21 with the winners announced on Saturday, September 19.

How to enter

Taking part is really easy and FREE to enter, simply fill in the form below along with a picture of your much-loved pet or alternatively you can email your entry to comps@eveningtelegraph.co.uk

An error has occurred while loading your details. Please click the following link to try again – if the issue persists, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Try again by refreshing the page.

Competition rules

Only one entry per pet. All photos must be of hi-res quality.

Entry period closes on Friday August 21 2020; no entries will be accepted after 5pm on this day.

For full terms and conditions, please send large self-addressed envelope to Paw Prints, Evening Telegraph NP Marketing, 2 Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 1DD or see the Tele’s competitions online terms.

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About

We breed and Train Healthy Frenchie puppies, We are a family of 8 our youngest is 3 years old and we find it amazing to be around this beautiful creatures. We also do puppy rescue and give them out for adoption, it has been our family’s way of saying we care for the world for over 13 years now…

Contact

Email: info@greenfieldfrenchie.com

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